Friday, November 13, 2015

PUBLIC SPEAKING: Your Next Speech - Rule Number ONE

How many big words do you know?  How good were you with vocabulary in grammar school?

Two questions that tie into something everyone should know when working on their next speech. 

I’ve written more than a few … for me and for others.  And I’ve seen plenty come across my desk from speakers, and communications folks writing speaking points for their corporate executives.


Golden Rule in Speech Writing
Here is the ONE simple rule when writing your speech.


“Write like you speak, and never speak like it’s written.”


Think about it.  Big words are great on paper, good for journalists telling stories with descriptive words, and valuable for authors of books.  But rarely, if ever, do people drop the big words on people in conversation.  And after all, speeches are supposed to be conversational.

So... think back to your grammar days when you were learning basic vocabulary words.  To this day, adults engage in conversation using the most basic words, not the most complex.  We want people to stay with us, not lose focus trying to understand what it is you are saying.

Put the Dictionary Away - Converse
Public speaking is a non-written form of communication that is meant to be conversational.  I’ve never heard anyone say “kill them with information and as many big words as you can.”  Instead, it’s about holding people’s attention and engaging your audience.  We do that through dynamic verbal delivery, not a spoken delivery of the dictionary.

So when writing your next speech … try not to worry about every last word.  Write for delivery of your message because our goal is not to create an audience “word search,” but to send people out the door ready to spread your message.

Thanks for reading along.  I welcome your opinion by following me on Twitter @KraigKann and sharing your views.
 
Thought of the Day: The successful speech isn't about blowing people away with scripted information, it's about dynamic delivery of a repeatable message that provides value.